Poshmark isn’t for everyone. It’s a highly active community with A LOT of users, and it grows by the thousands every day. But, sometimes Poshmark just doesn’t seem to be working. Or, maybe you just want to try something new and expand your opportunities. Whatever your reason for checking out other options that are similar to Poshmark, I’ve probably tried it. Check out below to get the skinny.

Mercari

The Good

  • Pick your own shipping costs
  • Simple listing platform
  • You can “promote” your listings
  • You can list anything you’re willing to ship

The Bad

  • No social component or promotion option that doesn’t require a price drop
  • No bundle feature
  • The do not allow stock-only pics 

The Money

Mercari can be a great place to sell clothing or other items that aren’t supposed to be listed on Poshmark. Also, it’s a great place to sell items that have a lower value because your buyers don’t have to dish out $6.49 in shipping no matter what. That said, I don’t count on Mercari to be my #1 storefront. Because there is no social component, sales can be slow unless you’re constantly listing or continuously dropping your prices to get eyes on your items. It’s a great supplemental storefront and their client base is growing every day. If you’re committed to re-selling, I absolutely recommending using Mercari to boost your numbers and give you the ability to sell to your customers for a cheaper price.

Relovv

The Good

  • Pricing starts with what you want to MAKE
  • Easy listing platform
  • You can make money off of other people’s items and they don’t lose any money

The Bad

  • Low usership
  • No ability to promote your own items
  • Unclear
  • No search feature for shoppers (thought they have stated they are actively working toward it)

The Money

I actually have a lot to say about Relovv even though I don’t use it anymore. One of my favorite things about using Relovv was starting pricing with the profit I wanted to see. I also truly appreciate that their marketing focuses on the concept of clothes being reloved (hence the name), but there is no mechanism in place to prohibit selling boutique items bought for the purpose of re-selling. But, I digress. Their pricing feature made it a lot easier to keep track of my numbers and feel confident that I was pricing my item correctly for my needs as a seller. Additionally, it is fun to “relovv” items in your closet from other sellers with the potential of getting a little bit of commission off the sale. However, Relovv’s low usership is truly a problem, because while their name is cute and they’re getting some positive attention, my items weren’t getting much attention at all. If you are into taking chances, Relovv may be a great opportunity for making a name for yourself in a budding fashion community. 

Vinted

The Good

  • They don’t take commission from the seller
  • You can list your items for as low as $1
  • You can adjust shipping costs on your own 

The Bad

  • No social component
  • The buying process is tedious and can allow people to not complete a purchase
  • Their website and app run slowly

The Money

Vinted is a fun place to sell, and an even more fun place to shop. You can actually buy something for $1, but since Vinted “doesn’t charge commission,” they have to get their money from somewhere. That money comes in the form of a “buy protection fee,” which is added on when your buyer goes to check out. So, that $1 shirt becomes $1.75, then a $4 shipping charge is added on. So, while the total is still a low $6, it’s quite a bit higher than the initial $1 you/your buyer wanted to pay. That means buyers expect to see low base prices, such as $30 for for an item you might list for $50 on Posh. Math tells you that the Vinted item is going to be cheaper for the buyer either way, but reality says you have to list it for significantly cheaper on Vinted or no one is going to buy from you because they know there is an additional mystery charge before they check out. So, either there’s some really interesting psychological stuff going on here or Vinted shoppers (like me) are basically cheapskates.

As you can see, I have put a lot of thought into this. An additional problem that made me quit using vinted for most items is that it requires confirmation of shipping from the seller, then completion of the purchase from the buyer once shipping has been established. I’ve lost a lot of sales during this last step.

Tradesy

The Good

  • They’ve been around for a while
  • Their customer base is used to high-end pricing
  • They run site-wide promotions that you can participate in

The Bad

  • No social component
  • The listing form is long and time-consuming
  • They do not allow low-res pics  

The Money

Mercari can be a great place to offload a few of your old items and to flip clothing or other items that. However, I personally don’t count on Mercari to be my #1 storefront. Because there is no social component, sales can be slow unless you’re constantly listing or continuously dropping your prices to get eyes on your items. However, it’s a great supplemental storefront and their client base is growing every day! 

eBay

The Good

  • Huge customer base
  • Pick your own shipping costs
  • There are soooo many options for listing

The Bad

  • No social component
  • Low-ballers abound
  • There are soooo many options for listing
  • Their interface is very frustrating

The Money

You’ll notice I qualified the numerous options for listing as both a pro and a con. If you have a lot of different types of items and want to make them available to different markets, eBay’s many options can be great. However, if you are new to selling, you might want to hold off on using eBay until you get a better feel for your markets. But, don’t forget about it if you really want to make a push for lots of sales. eBay has–by far–the largest market of buyers. Because of the competitive market, you can expect to be lowballed (but if you’re a Posher, you’re used to this). However, it’s a great place to get a lot of eyes on your products AND you can make fairly quick sales if you price your items well.

DePop

The Good

  • Pick shipping costs
  • Easy listing platform
  • They curate featured items
  • Shopping on depop is fun

The Bad

  • No web/desktop version available
  • If you’re not one of the cool kids, you may never make a sale
  • The app glitches and crashes more frequently than others

The Money

depop is a super fun selling and buying marketplace, but I couldn’t tell you how to be successful on it. It positions itself as the “creative community’s mobile marketplace,” but I find that a bit intimidating, tbh. (I’m even second-guessing my use of “tbh.” Is that cool anymore? Idk. Idc.) The people who are popular on depop are the types of people who can wear a jacket that’s literally two completely different jackets sewn together and manage to look right in it. I don’t quite fit in, but I have read that people who do fit in can make a lot of money. Inspiring, really. But that’s basically all I have to say about that.

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